Nintendo Famicom Mini: examining Japan's tiny console | Virgin Media
Nintendo Famicom Mini: examining Japan's tiny console

Nintendo Famicom Mini: examining Japan's tiny consoleby Ryan Lambie

23/11/2016Games

 
 

How does Japan's Famicom Mini compare to Nintendo's NES Classic Mini console? A new video explains all...

You probably already know that Nintendo's big hardware release this autumn is the NES Classic Mini: a tiny version of its fondly-remembered 8-bit console which comes pre-packaged with 30 games, including Super Mario Bros, Metroid and The Legend Of Zelda. You may also have heard that Nintendo of Japan is releasing its own miniature console, the Family Computer Mini, which shrinks down the system's original design to an adorably dinky size - complete with wired in controllers.

See related  Essential anime for beginners Scarlett Johansson on a standalone Black Widow movie

Exactly how small the Famicom Mini is may not have been clear from the promotional stuff released by Nintendo, but with the 10th November seeing the launch of the console in Japan, YouTuber Gaijillionaire has managed to get his hands on one - and subsequently put together a video which unboxes the system and compares it to its bigger, now much yellower 1983 parent.

We also get to see which games come on the Japanese version compared to the US edition: where America gets Bubble Bobble and Kid Icarus, Japan gets the likes of River City Ransom and Solomon's Key as replacements.

This is a test.

It's a great looking device, even if the controllers do look a little too tiny for comfort; as a collectible piece of gaming history, it looks like a great purchase - assuming you can get it on import that is. Meanwhile, just to fan the nostalgia flames a bit further, Nintendo has uploaded all the original manuals for the Famicom Mini's 30 games to its website. You can check out all that gorgeous 80s graphic design in PDF form here.

 

This article was written by Ryan Lambie from Den of Geek and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.